Monthly Archives: November 2007

Part Two:- Self Drive Botswana.

A trip to Botswana in the sense of a self drive is not one for the faint hearted. Where as in Kruger Park the amenities, Rangers and other park goers are there to assist you should anything go wrong, in Moremi, Savuti and Chobe there are no such real conveniences or luxuries. There are no shops and apart from a few circumstances, the amenities are at best rudimentary. So before deciding on doing such a trip, discuss it with people that have been there before. If you are a 3, 4 or 5 Star traveler, then the adventure of sleeping on a wonky rooftop bed for two weeks, surrounded by hostile predators, elephants and things that sting, bite and harass, will probably make the decision easier.

This trip is no camping expedition into known territory. There are no guides to help us out. The flat tires get were fixed there and then, with the girls as lookouts and the fixers breaking formula one records to get the tires changed over.

A key to a successful trip is in the planning. I was lucky enough to travel with my friend Ollie and his wife Mrs. Attenborough (Mrs. A is an amazing birder, game spotter and fount of information about Africa. of course, she’s African). Ollie is a genius with the details and with some input from yours truly a plan, day by day was made. On this sort of trip you have to plan it down to the liters of diesel carried, water, food and bathing needs and essentials. Spreadsheets make the job a lot easier.

The FULL STORY continues in the link.

Part Two:- Self Drive Botswana.

2 comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

  • ollieDecember 17, 2007 - 12:03 pm

    Dude, good summary of the trip…. it should carry a health warning: Should only be attempted by the adventurous types. Planning is critical, since you will not always find good drinking water, and fuel. Hmm having said this, I think it’s time for another adventure. I think the Caprivi and Northern Namibia…….ReplyCancel

  • ollieDecember 17, 2007 - 12:05 pm

    Dude, good summary of the trip….should carry a health warning: Should only be attempted by the adventurous types. Planning is critical, since you will not always find good drinking water, and fuel. Hmm having said this, I think it’s time for another adventure. I think the Caprivi and Northern Namibia…….ReplyCancel

Shooting from a Vehicle in Africa – Part One

Probably the most common way to shoot wildlife is from a Vehicle. Wandering around in the velt is fine, with guards (armed or not, buy that’s another story or three) but it’s slow and the key to success in the African Savannah is covering lots of territory. Animals wandering the tundra (how many cliches can I pack into one paragraph) are the ultimate nomads and constantly patrol their patches for food and to detect / repel intruders.

The FULL STORY continues in the here

Shooting from a Vehicle in Africa - Part One

2 comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *

  • RayNovember 27, 2007 - 2:50 am

    Nice! Feels like I have actually spent a day with you guys in the Kriger Park. And…much better fun than a hunt with guns, bullets, blood, and gunky stuff like that.ReplyCancel

  • RSNovember 27, 2007 - 4:31 am

    A BRAAI is quite different from ‘brie’ which is a LEKKER cheese, very good with a NAARTJE.

    As an old Kruger hand (from Crocodile Bridge to Crooks’ Corner) I’d say that account was pretty good as far as it goes, but here’s a few more oddments.

    The northerly part of the park is mostly rather uninteresting mopani scrub, and can be disappointing. The far north has a small belt of interesting riparian forest close to the Limpopo (Crested Eagle, Kori Bustard), but it’s a long way to go from the ‘heartland’ up as far as Olifants.

    Night drives (you have to be taken on these by the rangers) are well worth doing and allow you to see things you will not see at all in the daytime. They typically start late afternoon (say, 17:30) and last about three hours. Use of flash is quite acceptable (but have a care for the animals).

    Daytime game walks (with rangers, ALWAYS armed) are not for the faint-hearted or ill-disciplined, and require a quite different photographic approach from vehicle-based photography, but can be very rewarding – they are the best way to get a real feel for the bush.

    NEVER get out of your vehicle except at designated hides or picnic sites, and even then exercise care – lions see you as prey, and are amazingly good at Not Being Seen. Remember the od adage that for every anumal you see, ten see you. Ten may be an under-estimate.

    Don’t let your desire to have the maximum amount of photographic equipment with you displace a good pair of binoculars.ReplyCancel

The Abbott

On a Yearly pilgrimage,the family heads down to Southern Thailand (Surat Thani) to remember those who have departed before us.

It is a time of contemplation, meditation, food and drink. It’s a family and friends time. Plus we got to play cards…..

Here’s the Abbott. The String joins everyone together in the prayer process.

Women are not allowed to touch Monks, so the string gives the people the ability to “join”.

The Abbott

no comments
Add a comment...

Your email is never published or shared. Required fields are marked *